What Europe Can Teach Us About Keeping The Internet Open And Free

Russia makes new threats over Ukraine’s pro-Europe policy

Here are 5 things you need to know about the election: Why does it matter? Germany is Europe’s biggest economy, a manufacturing and export powerhouse. Its 2.7 trillion euro GDP accounts for nearly 30% of euro zone output. And the country has gained influence because of its role as the biggest financial contributor to Europe’s bailouts. Merkel may be a hated figure to some Europeans for her insistence on austerity in return for aid, but most Germans approve of her handling of the crisis. Who is likely to win? Until recently, Merkel and her coalition allies had a clear lead in opinion polls, but support for her party and the FDP has fallen. If the FDP drops below the 5% threshold needed to win seats in parliament, Merkel will lose her preferred coalition partner. Analysts say a repeat of the 2005-2009 coalition with the Social Democrats is now the most likely outcome of Sunday’s vote, particularly if the new anti-euro party AfD makes a breakthrough. Related: Could euroskeptics spoil Angela Merkel’s election party What’s at stake in Europe? With the recession over and markets calmer, the pace of EU policy making has eased. But big challenges remain for a region still facing slow growth, record unemployment , an aging population and rising debt .

Summit Europe, Singularity University’s First Public Event, Coming November 15-16 To Budapest

At issue was the concept of net neutrality the notion that all Internet traffic, no matter where it’s going or who it came from, should be treated the same. Internet service providers say the rule makes it hard to manage network load at peak hours. Supporters say that if the FCC’s net neutrality rule is overturned, it could harm competition and consumer choice online, as companies who cut deals with incumbent broadband providers gain a leg up over those who can’t afford to pay their fees. If American policymakers had made different choices a decade ago, we might have avoided this fight altogether. If the market for ISPs was a little more competitive, consumers would have more choice and broadband providers would have less power to pick winners in the Internet economy. The question is, what would a more competitive broadband market look like? One way to find out is to look at what other countries have done. Experts point to Europe, where nations have committed themselves to something called local loop unbundling. That’s a fancy term for when major network operators are required to share the infrastructure they built with other service providers. In France, unbundling dropped the costs of starting a new ISP to attractive levels. Start-ups didn’t have to worry about laying their own cables; they just piggybacked off the existing ones. As the market flourished with more ISPs, according to the New America Foundation’s Danielle Kehl, some of those providers even began building their own Internet infrastructure that could compete with the big carriers.

Officials from Ukraine and its old Soviet master Russia clashed at an international gathering in the Black Sea resort of Yalta over Kiev’s plans to sign landmark agreements in November with the European Union on political association and free trade. Moody’s Investor Service cut Ukraine’s sovereign credit rating on Friday, partly on concern over relations with Russia. Russia says it fears its market could be flooded by competitive EU goods entering Ukraine free of import duties and being re-exported across the long border with Russia. But Prime Minister Mykola Azarov, in a speech to the conference, dismissed the threat of illegal transit of EU goods into Russia as a “hypothetical” one that would not happen in practice. “We are convinced that the signing (of the agreements with the EU) does not hold any risks (for Russia),” he said, adding that he would give personal assurances of this to Russia and its trade allies in the Moscow-led Customs Union. He also expressed frustration at Russia’s refusal to cut the price of the gas it sells to Ukraine and said Kiev may have to reduce further the volume of its gas imports. Ukraine’s pro-Europe drive has already drawn threats of counter-measures from Russian President Vladimir Putin, as well as pressure on Kiev to join the Customs Union. Speaking after Azarov on Saturday, Sergei Glazyev, an aide to Putin, returned to the attack, saying that Russia might be obliged to impose duties on any goods arriving from Ukrainian territory, at a huge financial cost to Ukraine. Saying 40 percent of Ukrainians had doubts over the agreements with the EU, Glazyev, who has made hawkish comments before about Ukraine’s pro-Europe policy, urged the Kiev government to ballot its people. “Let us … ask the Ukrainian people what choice they prefer,” he said. TYMOSHENKO RELEASE Azarov had sharp words for Russia over its refusal to cut the price of its gas, which hangs heavy on Ukraine’s cash-strapped economy. Ukraine pays what it sees as an exorbitant $400 per thousand cubic meters under a 2009 contract, which Russia has refused to redraw.

merkel campaign trail

The program aims to stimulate an awareness and discussion among the public of the global impact that exponential technologies will have in shaping our future whether youre an executive, policy maker or entrepreneur. A preview of the event is highlighted in the following video: Over the course of the program, participants will gain a deeper understanding of the robotics revolution, the security challenges of an increasing digital world, the future of energy, innovations in biotech and medicine that are transforming the role of physicians, and the resulting impact on ethics, society, the economy, and the regulatory environment. Participants will understand what these changes mean for future business opportunities in Europe and beyond. Furthermore, a showcase of the breakthrough startups accelerated at Singularity University Labs will highlight the entrepreneurs and innovators working to improve the lives of billions around the world. In parallel, free design and technology workshops (open to the public) will also be held in downtown Budapest that will host hands-on workshops for kids including topics related to robotics, strawberry DNA and the tools of 3D printing. Even though the Summit isnt until November, the excitement surrounding the event is already building. Last Thursday in Budapest, Singularity University held a launch party for the Summit Europe hosted by the Commercial Section of the U.S. Embassy in Budapest. U.S. Commercial Counselor, Robert Peaslee, was in attendance with a host of regional organizations to celebrate Singularity Universitys 5th anniversary and the upcoming November event. This is an incredible opportunity to join innovators, executives, and policy makers to understand the opportunities presented by the defining technologies of our age.