New York Film Fest: ‘secret Life Of Walter Mitty’ Splits Critics, Charms Festivalgoers (analysis)

Former Hells Angels leader slams New York beating after motorcycle chase

Lien’s wife, Rosalyn Ng, has said that her family’s sympathies go out to Mieses, but that they had to flee a dangerous situation. She said her husband was trying to protect her and their child. Jerry Langton wrote several books on motorcycle clubs, including a profile on Walter Stadnick, the founder of the Hells Angels in Canada. Langton said the riders who appeared in the video are far from being a true motorcycle club. These clubs, like the Hells Angels or Outlaws, often wear uniforms, ride Harleys and adhere to a code of conduct that would oppose what was seen in the video, Langton said. “It would be highly frowned on to be violent in front of a wife and kid,” he said. “Let’s just say that.” Langton recalled a story of an associate from the Montreal chapter of Hells Angels who accidentally killed an 11-year-old in a bombing. That associate was later killed. A former rider with the Legion of Doom, a New York motorcycle club, told FoxNews.com that these bikers who terrorize motorists give responsible bikers a bad name. These thrown-together groups are often comprised of riders out for a thrill who take little precaution. “I don’t have any respect for people who don’t know how to ride in a proper formation on the highway,” said Angel, the former rider who only gave his first name for the report. “You also don’t chase and beat up a man in front of his family. They’re a bunch of cowards.” Angel, now 48, rode motorcycles since he was a teenager in Puerto Rico and continued in Brooklyn until he got married in 2004. “If I was with my family and I was being chased, I would have just drove my SUV into as many of them as I could,” he said.

our editor recommends NYFF REVIEW: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty On Saturday morning, the film’s first press screening generated sharply divided reactions, but the prevailing reaction at its official world premiere on Saturday night, as the fest’s Centerpiece Screening, was much more positive: it received a lengthy standing ovation. Stiller introduced the film at its premiere by saying, tongue-in-cheek, “I want to thank the Film Society of Lincoln Center for having the courage to include a Ben Stiller film in the festival. Noting that he grew up just 20 blocks from Alice Tully Hall, where the screening took place, he added thatWalter Mitty was a “valentine” to New York, having been shot all across the city. The dramedywas loosely adapted bySteve Conradfrom a 1939 James ThurberNew Yorker short story, which itself was made into a musical-comedy motion picture starring Danny Kaye in 1947. The new film takes place in the present day. It stars Stiller as the title character, a good-hearted but sad-sack loner who has known sadness, sacrificed for others and worked all-but-invisibly for 16 years in the photo processing department at waning Life magazine. A perpetual daydreamer prone to awkwardness, he develops a crush on a coworker (Kristen Wiig), but before he can muster the courage to do anything about it he loses a photo from a famous photographer (Sean Penn), prompting his new boss (a heavily bearded Adam Scott) to tell him that he will lose his job if he doesn’t find it. In order to track it down, Walter Mitty must finally go out and experience the world. PHOTOS: New York Film Festival 2013: 13 Movies to Know This sort of a story is not new. It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) is about a man who gave up so much for others that he never had time for himself. The Wizard of Oz (1939) is about a girl who ventures far from home and eventually concludes that there’s no place like it. And Stranger Than Fiction (2006), a film that possesses a tone perhaps most similar to Mitty’s, is about a man whose bland life becomes dangerous and exciting because of the presence of unusual activity in his mind. Films of this sort are generally categorized as “fantasy,” which is not the Academy’s favorite genre, and this year’s awards season is tremendously competitive, so I cannot say with any degree of confidence that this film will be nominated for any major Oscars.